Instant Results and Persistence

Fotolia_65898753_Subscription_Monthly_MWhen a basketball player shoots a basketball, they can evaluate the outcome of their performance right away. Either they made the shot, or they missed. In contrast, if you consider advanced strength athletes who are training to get stronger, or distance runners who are training to improve their time by a few seconds, they won’t see the results of their efforts by the end of their workout. They must wait until future workouts to evaluate whether or not a previous workout helped them to improve. The truth be known, at the advanced level, it often takes athletes weeks or months of workouts to make any improvements and clearly evaluate the results of what they have been doing.  Continue reading Instant Results and Persistence

A Curved Path to Your Destiny

Running A Curve

the Fosbury flopOne of the track and field events that I did in high school was the high jump. Dwight Stones was a great high jumper at the time and I learned an important lesson from watching him and listening to my coaches. I learned that in order to succeed at the high jump, it was better to run a curved path than to run a straight path when approaching the bar for takeoff. When a curved approach is done properly, it helps to transition forward momentum into upward momentum in order to jump higher. Continue reading A Curved Path to Your Destiny

Getting Out of a Bad Situation

Getting Out of a Bad Situation

Fotolia_3342285_Subscription_Monthly_MWhen a football team has a great punter, the punter can be a great advantage when the team  finds themselves in poor position. A great punter can blast the ball out of a bad place and put the opponent in a poor starting position instead. Suddenly, the team that was originally in a bad situation isn’t in such a bad situation anymore, and the other team will find themselves under pressure from being so far back. Continue reading Getting Out of a Bad Situation

The Right Time

The Right Time

Fotolia_62047262_Subscription_Monthly_MLarry was a student at the high school that I attended. He was not a part of the athletes who seemed to have the ability to excel at every sport. In many regards, it seemed that Larry was left out when it came to athletic ability. He lacked the ability to excel at throwing, catching, kicking, dribbling, and dodging, however, he could do one thing better than anyone else, he could run fast, very fast.  Continue reading The Right Time

Talent

Fotolia_67948807_Subscription_Monthly_MTalent

In the 2004 Olympics, Michael Phelps won six gold and two bronze medals in swimming. In the 2008 Olympics he won 8 golds, and in 2012 he won four gold and two silver medals for a total of 22 Olympic medals; the most of anyone in Olympic history. It’s true that Michael Phelps is talented, but talent by itself is not enough. If Michael just went for a casual swim every now and then, he wouldn’t have made it very far in swimming. Given his ability, he may have been better than average even with no training, but he wouldn’t have made it to the elite competitive level. Continue reading Talent

Culture

Culture

 If I had to point to one thing that I believe makes a bigger difference than any other thing in terms of sports development, it would be this; culture. Cultures contain all kinds of important things such as: values, what people do for social interaction, how they interact when they get together, how people spend their time, mindsets, attitudes, what’s important, and what’s not. When cultures focus on a certain sport, encourage participation in that sport, socialize around that sport, celebrate around that sport, and honor those who succeed at that sport, people in that culture will get good at that sport. Continue reading Culture